Sathish Kumar

skumar82@wisc.edu

Department of Comparative Biosciences
Office: 3256
Website

Sathish Kumar

Titles and Education

  1. Associate Professor, Comparative Biosciences, UW School of Veterinary Medicine

  2. Associate Professor (adjunct), Obstetrics and Gynecology, UW School of Medicine & Public Health

  3. Postdoctoral Fellow, Cardiovascular Physiology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Texas, 2007-9

  4. Postdoctoral Fellow, Cardiovascular Toxicology, Southern University, Louisiana, 2004-7

  5. PhD in Veterinary Pharmacology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, India, 2003

  6. Masters in Veterinary Pharmacology, Tamilnadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, India, 1999

  7. DVM, Tamilnadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, India, 1996

Research

VISIT THE KUMAR LAB WEBSITE

My laboratory examines questions of vascular and placental biology relevant to human health and disease. We use both animal models as well as human clinical materials in our studies.  Under this broad focus, research areas include: 

(1) Pregnancy associated adaptations and implications for pathophysiology of preeclampsia: To understand the mechanisms of vascular adaptations and placental functions during pregnancy and how alterations in endocrine hormones (e.g. androgens, renin angiotensin system, etc) lead to development of preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction.

2) Fetal origins of hypertension: Examine how hormonal changes and other adverse perinatal environment cause reprogramming of fetal organs to lead to development of adult life hypertension.

3) Sex-specific hypertension mechanisms: Examine why normal vascular and endothelial functions and hypertension signaling mechanisms are different between males and females and how sex steroid hormones play a regulatory role. This will help develop sex specific antihypertensive treatment strategies.

4) Therapeutic implications: To develop nutritional and pharmacologic therapeutic strategies that will have a practical clinical potential for prevention and treatment of abnormal maternal vascular adaptations and programming of hypertension.

These studies will offer exciting insights in understanding the mechanisms that contribute for abnormal maternal vascular adaptations and perinatal origins of adult diseases, and develop strategic ways to improve the lives of pregnant women and their children. The impact of this research is likely to have significant positive repercussions in other programmable adult diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.

Responsibilities

  • Veterinary Physiology A (fall semester)
  • Developmental Anatomy (fall semester)

Recent Publications

  1. Click here for complete list
  2. Gopalakrishnan,K.; Mishra, J.; Chinnathambi,V.; Vincent, K.; Patrikeev, I.; Motamedi, M.; Saade, G.; Hankins, G.D.; Sathishkumar K. Elevated Testosterone Reduces Uterine Blood Flow, Spiral Artery Elongation and Placental Oxygenation in Pregnant Rats. Hypertension. 67 (3):630-9; 2016.
  3. Chinnathambi, V.; Balakrishnan, M.; Ramadoss, J.; Yallampalli, C.; Sathishkumar, K. Testosterone Alters Maternal Vascular Adaptations: Role of the Endothelial NO System. Hypertension. 61:647-54; 2013.

  4. Mishra, J.; Hankins, G.D.; Kumar, S. Testosterone downregulates angiotensin II type-2 receptor via androgen receptor-mediated ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway in rat aorta. J Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone Syst. 17(4); 2016.

  5. Chinnathambi, V.; Yallampalli, C.; Sathishkumar, K. Prenatal testosterone induces sex-specific dysfunction in endothelium-dependent relaxation pathways in adult male and female rats. Biol Reprod. 89:97; 2013.

  6. Chinnathambi, V.; Blesson, C.S.; Yallampalli, C.; Vincent, K.; Saade, G.; Hankins, G. D.; Sathishkumar, K. Elevated testosterone levels during rat pregnancy causes hypersensitivity to ANG II and attenuation of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in uterine arteries. Hypertension. 64:405-14; 2014.

  7. More, A.; Mishra, J.; Hankins, G.D.V.; Yallampalli, C.; Sathishkumar, K. Enalapril Normalizes Endothelium-Derived Hyperpolarizing Factor–Mediated Relaxation in Mesenteric Artery of Adult Hypertensive Rats Prenatally Exposed to Testosterone. Biol Reprod. 92:155; 2015.

  8. Chinnathambi, V.; Balakrishnan, M.; Ramadoss, J.; Yallampalli, C.; Sathishkumar, K. Response to Testosterone and Sympathetic Nerve Activity during Pregnancy. Hypertension. 61:e45; 2013.

  9. Subramanian, K.; Naik, V.D.; Sathishkumar, K.; Sawant, O.B.; Washburn, S.E.; Wu, G.; Yallampalli, C.; Saade, G.R.; Hankins, G.D.; Ramadoss, J. Interactive effects of In Vitro Binge-Like Alcohol and ATP on Umbilical Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Post-Translational Modifications and Redox Modulation. Reprod Toxicol. 43:94-101; 2014.

  10. Chinnathambi, V.; More, A.S.; Yallampalli, C.; Hankins, G. D.; Sathishkumar, K.  Gestational exposure to elevated testosterone levels induces hypertension via heightened vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor signaling in rats. Biol Reprod. 91:1-7; 2014.

  11. Blesson, C.S.; Sathishkumar, K.; Chinnathambi, V.; Yallampalli, C. Gestational protein restriction impairs insulin-regulated glucose transport mechanisms in gastrocnemius muscles of adult male offspring. Endocrinology. 155:3036-46; 2014.

  12. Yallampalli, C.; Chauhan, M.; Endsley, J.; Sathishkumar K. Calcitonin gene related family peptides: importance in normal placental and fetal development. Adv Exp Med Biol. 814:229-40; 2014.

  13. Subramanian, K.; Naik, V.D.; Sathishkumar, K.; Yallampalli, C.; Saade, G.R.; Hankins, G.D.; Ramadoss, J. Chronic binge alcohol exposure during pregnancy impairs rat maternal uterine vascular function. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 38:1832-8; 2014.

  14. Blesson, C.S.; Chinnathambi, V.; Hankins, G. D.; Yallampalli, C.; Sathishkumar, K. Prenatal Testosterone Exposure Induces Hypertension in Adult Females via Androgen Receptor-Dependent Pkcδ-Mediated Mechanism. Hypertension. 65:683-90; 2015.

  15. Sathishkumar, K.; Balakrishnan, M.P.; Yallampalli C. Enhanced Mesenteric Arterial Responsiveness to Angiotensin II Is Androgen Receptor-Dependent in Prenatally Protein-Restricted Adult Female Rat Offspring. Biol Reprod. 92:55; 2015.

  16. More, A.; Mishra, J.; Gopalakrishnan, K.;Blesson, C.S.; Hankins, G.D.V.; Yallampalli, C.; Sathishkumar, K. Prenatal Testosterone Exposure Leads to Gonadal Hormone-Dependent Hyperinsulinemia and Gonadal Hormone-Independent Glucose Intolerance in Adult Male Rat Offspring. Biol Reprod. 94(1):5; 2015.

  17. More, A.; Mishra, J.; Hankins, G.D.; Kumar, S. Prenatal Testosterone Exposure Decreases Aldosterone Production but Maintains Normal Plasma Volume and Increases Blood Pressure in Adult Female Rats. Biol Reprod. 95 (2):42; 2016.

  18. Gopalakrishnan,K.; More, A.; Hankins, G.D.; Nanovskaya, T.N.; Kumar, S. Postnatal cardiovascular consequences in the offspring of pregnant rats exposed to smoking and smoking cessation pharmacotherapies. Reprod Sci. 24(6):919-933; 2017.

  19. Mishra, J.; More, A.; Hankins, G.D.; Kumar, S. Hyperandrogenemia Reduces Endothelium-Derived Hyperpolarizing Factor-Mediated Relaxation in Mesenteric Artery of Female Rats. Biol Reprod. doi: 10.1093/biolre/iox043; 2017.

  20. Sheibani, L,; Lechuga, T,;  Zhang, H,; Hameed, A,; Winga, D,; Kumar, S,; Rosenfeld, C, ;Chen DB.  Augmented H2S Production via CBS Upregulation Plays a Role in Pregnancy associated Uterine Vasodilation. Biol Reprod. 96(3):664-672; 2017.

  21. Blesson, C.S.; Chinnathambi, V.; Kumar, S,; Yallampalli, C. Gestational Protein Restriction impairs Glucose Disposal in the Gastrocnemius muscles of Female Rats. Endocrinology. 158(4):756-767; 2017.

  22. Chapters in Books
  23. Yallampalli, C.; Chauhan, M.; Sathishkumar, K. Calcitonin Gene Related Family Peptides in Vascular Adaptations, Uteroplacental Circulation and Fetal Growth. Cur Vas Pharm, 11:641-54;  2013

  24. Yallampalli, C.; Chauhan, M.; Endsley, J.; Sathishkumar, K. Calcitonin Gene Related Family Peptides: importance in normal placental and fetal development.  Advances in Fetal and Neonatal Physiology, 814:229-40; 2014

  25. Sathishkumar, K.; Yallampalli, C.  Sex Dimorphism in Developmental Programming of Health and Disease. Book title: “Stress and Developmental Programming of Health and Disease: Beyond Phenomenology” by Nova Science Publishers, Inc. Hauppauge NY, page 541-558; 2014