The Hornberger Lab

Lab Members


Troy Hornberger: Principle Investigator
Started the lab at UW-Madison in 2007. Loves everything about skeletal muscle and trying to figure out how mechanical signals regulate its size.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nathaniel Steinert: Graduate Student
Joined the lab as an undergraduate in 2016. Currently a PhD student in the CBMS program that is studying the role that TRIM28 plays in the regulation of skeletal muscle size and function.

 

Kuan-Hung (Parker) Lin: Graduate Student
Joined the lab in 2017 as a graduate student in the CBMS program. His dissertation project is focused on identifying the molecular mechanisms that regulate myogenesis.

 

Kent Jorgenson: Graduate Student
Graduate student in the Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology (MCP) PhD program that joined the lab in 2018. Kent’s dissertation project is focused on defining the ultrastructural adaptations that occur during the mechanical load-induced growth of skeletal muscle.

 

Wenyuan Zhu: Graduate Student
PhD student in the CBMS program that joined the lab in 2020. The goal of Wen’s current research is to develop a mouse model that mimics human resistance exercise.

 

Jamie Hibbert: Postdoctoral Fellow
Jamie began working with the lab in 2020 as a “virtual” member of the group. She will be “physically” starting in the lab in July 2021 and her research will be aimed at defining how the mechanical signals imposed on skeletal muscle during exercise get converted into the biochemical events that result in hypertrophy.

 

Melissa Torbey: Undergraduate Student
Joined the lab in 2018. She is working towards her undergraduate degree in Kinesiology with the longer-term goal of attending medical school. Her research involves the use of in vitro and in vivo models to study the role that TRIM28 plays in skeletal muscle regeneration

 

Jake Lemens: Undergraduate Student
Has been a member of the lab since 2019. Is currently working on his undergraduate degree in Kinesiology with the hopes of becoming a physical therapist. To date, his research has been focused on the development of imaging techniques that can be used to visualize and quantify the changes in satelitte cells that occur in response to various perturbations.

 

Philip Flejsierowicz: Undergraduate Student
Philip is an undergraduate in Microbiology with plans to continue his education in medical school. He joined the lab in 2019 and his research is aimed at understanding how mechanical signals induce the longitudinal growth of muscle fibers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jake Hermanson: Adjunct Graduate Student
Joined the lab as an undergraduate in 2017. Is currently a PhD student in UW-Madison’s Biochemical and Molecular Nutrition graduate program and is studying the role of gut microbiota in chronic liver disease. However, he still loves skeletal muscle research and remains involved with many of our meetings and discussions.