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PEOPLE

Lab Director Tony on trail

Tony L. Goldberg, Professor of Epidemiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  • DVM, 2000, University of Illinois
  • MS, Epidemiology, 2000, University of Illinois
  • Ph.D., Anthropology, 1996, Harvard University
  • B.A., Biology & English, 1990, Amherst College

My training spans the biological and social sciences, which helps my laboratory engage in cross-disciplinary research. In addition to my professional interests, I enjoy the outdoors (hiking, biking, canoeing, fishing, skiing) as well as literature, music, theatre, and a diversity of other cultural activities, all of which are readily available in and around the wonderful city of Madison, Wisconsin.

Download CV (PDF format)

Click here to see Dr. Goldberg's ScienceLives profile on the National Science Foundation's website!

 

Lab members

The Goldberg lab consists of a dedicated group of motivated and diverse individuals. Although projects, programs, and their associated approaches vary widely, everyone is bound by a common interest in the ecology and evolution of health and disease, a commitment to conservation, a strong work ethic, and a spirit of cooperation.

 

Graduate students, post-docs, and scientists in training

Andrew Bennett (PhD Student, Comparative Biomedical Sciences Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison). Ecology and evolution of emerging primate viruses.

Lewis Campbell (Post-doc, University of Wisconsin-Madison). Ecology, pathogenesis and control of white-nose syndrome in bats.

Chris Dunn (Scientist in training, University of Wisconsin-Madison). Pathogen discovery and ecology.

Sagan Friant (Post-doc, City University of New York, and visiting fellow, University of Wisconsin-Madison). Human health and wildlife conservation in Nigerian bushmeat hunting communities.

Tricia Fry (PhD Student, Comparative Biomedical Sciences Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison). Health and conservation of polar bears in a changing Arctic environment.

David Hyeroba (DVM, MS, Makerere University, Uganda). Health and demography of "village dogs" in Uganda.

Leah Owens (DVM/PhD Student, Comparative Biomedical Sciences Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison). Molecular ecology of parasites.

Avery Peace (PhD Student, Comparative Biomedical Sciences Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison). Tick-borne pathogens in the Upper Midwestern USA.

Whitney Thiel (MS Student, Freshwater and Marine Sciences Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison). Ecology and management of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in Wisconsin.

Karen Vanderwolf (PhD Student, University of Wisconsin-Madison). Microbial ecology and mycology of white-nose syndrome in bats.

Geoffrey Weny (DVM, MS, Makerere University, Uganda). Project Manager, Kibale EcoHealth Project, Uganda. Epidemiology of livestock disease in Western Uganda.

 

Veterinary and undergraduate students

Kayla Bonack (Undergraduate student, University of Wisconsin-Madison).  Parasitology and conservation of chimpanzees.

Kate Burkart (Undergraduate student, University of Wisconsin-Madison).  Parasitology and conservation of chimpanzees.

Jessica Carag (DVM student, University of Wisconsin-Madison).  Parasitology and conservation of wild primates and domestic dogs.

Tia Diaz (Undergraduate student, University of Wisconsin-Madison).  Parasitology and conservation of chimpanzees.

Kylie Grady (DVM student, University of Wisconsin-Madison).  Parasitology and conservation of chimpanzees.

 

Visiting scholars (past and present)

Barbara Colitti (PhD Student, University of Torino). Evolution and epidemiology of viruses of domestic livestock.

Francesco Cerutti (PhD Student, University of Torino). Evolution of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

Julius Nziza (Country Coordinatory, Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project, Rwanda). Molecular epidemiology of primate viruses.

Sarah Phillips-Garcia (PhD Student, University of New Mexico). Reproductive ecology, parasitology and genetics of chimpanzees.

 

Recent graduates (and where they are now)

Tavis Anderson (Research Scientist, USDA-ARS, Ames, IA). Ecology, evolution, and mathematical modeling of infectious disease.

Kelsey Brown (Undergraduate Student, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI). Parasitology of Nigerian primates.

Ria Ghai (Post-doc, Emory University, Atlanta, GA). Molecular epidemiology of helminth and protozoan parasites in Uganda.

Charles Hartley (University of Wisconsin-Madison class of 2013, Madison WI). Ecology of mosquito-borne disease in Chicago, USA.

Jeremy Hemberger (PhD student, University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Entomology, Madison WI). Ecology of mosquito invasion in Chicago, USA.

Carly Malavé (Research Associate, United States Geological Survey-Natonal Wildlife Health Center, Madison, WI). Human dimensions of infectious disease in Uganda.

Aleia McCord (Associate Director for African Studies, Univeristy of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI). Biogas and sustainable energy in Uganda.

Christina Newman (Post-doc, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI). Ecology and pathogenesis of West Nile virus and Culex flavivirus in Chicago.

Sarah Paige (Health Geographer, Public Health Institute, Washington, DC). Human dimensions of health and disease.

Mason Saari (Undergraduate Student, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI). Parasitology of Nigerian primates.

Sam Sibley (Technical Scientist, Promega Corporation, Fitchburg, WI). Viral discovery and evolution.

Tulika Singh (CRTA Fellow, National Institutes of Health, Center for Global Health, Bethesda, MD). Global human health in the developing world.

Mary Thurber (Zoo Vet Resident, San Diego Zoo, San Diego, CA). Ecology and epidemiology of parasitic disease in Uganda.

Michelle Verant (Veterinarian, United States Natonal Park Service, Fort Collins, CO). Control strategies for white-nose syndrome in bats of the United States.

Anna Wilson-Rothering (Farm Manager & Animal Research Operations, Wilson’s Prairie View Farm, Burlington, WI). Epidemiology and diagnostics of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in Wisconsin.

 

Collaborators

The complexity of problems at the intersection of health, disease, and ecology requires a team approach.  None of the projects in the Goldberg lab would be possible without the active participation of a talented set of collaborators. We are always seeking fruitful collaborations and welcome inquiries about cooperative projects.