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Celebrating Veterinary Technicians 

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National Veterinary Technician Week, October 13-19, provides a special opportunity to recognize the critical contributions of veterinary technicians, who are a key part of patients’ expert care team at UW Veterinary Care, the teaching hospital …

Standing CT for Horses, Developed at UW-Madison, Fills Longstanding Need in Veterinary Medicine

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Scientists at the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Veterinary Medicine have created a diagnostic imaging tool that could help prevent horse injuries through early detection and monitoring: a standing helical computed tomography (CT) scanner named Equina. It is the first CT scanner on the market to vertically scan the lower legs of a standing, sedated horse and also the first dual-purpose standing CT machine. This means it can scan up and down a patient’s legs and move horizontally to scan the head and neck – three areas of the body where CT is advantageous in teasing out anatomical intricacies.

Veterinarians Warn of Toxic Blue-Green Algae Dangers

Posted on VIN News Service
Larry the hound-shepherd mix may be one of few dogs to survive ingesting water laden with toxic blue-green algae. Owner Christopher Celi credits the University of Wisconsin's veterinary teaching hospital for saving the 2-year-old dog, now home and resting following six days of critical and supportive care.

Two Different Equine Diseases Detected in Wisconsin in Recent Weeks

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Following news from the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture and Consumer Protection (DATCP) in early August that 2019’s first case of Eastern equine encephalitis was detected in Wisconsin, another horse in Wisconsin was diagnosed with a separate disease called equine infectious anemia. It is the first time in 15 years this often-fatal blood-borne disease has been found in the state.

Dog With Broken Jaw, Matted Fur, Dental Infection Found on Side of Highway 12

Posted on WISC-TV3
The Sauk County Humane Society is asking for the public's help in funding the medical bills for a dog they found abandoned and abused. Jerry is now in surgery at University of Wisconsin Veterinary Care. Vets say most of his teeth will need to be removed because they are so badly infected and fur is so entangled in some of his teeth. His jaw is also broken.